Y Kabeya et al, 2022. Cross-sectional associations between the types/amounts of beverages consumed and the glycemia status: The Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Diabetes study, Metabol Open, published online.

May 11, 2022

ABSTRACT

Background:
The associations between the types/amounts of beverages consumed in daily life and measures of the glycemia status were investigated in a Japanese population-based cohort.

Methods:
Data from the baseline survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Diabetes cohort were used. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 3852 men and 6003 women who were evaluated under the fasting condition. The daily consumptions of coffee, green tea, oolong tea, black tea, soft drinks, fruit juices, or plain water were assessed using a self-reported questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses were performed using measures of the glycemia status (fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ) as dependent variables and the types/amounts of beverages consumed as the independent variables, to calculate the differences according to the types/amounts of beverages consumed.

Results:
In the multivariable-adjusted models, coffee consumption of ≥240 mL/day was significantly associated with a change of the FPG level by -1.9 mg/dL in men (p = 0.013) and -1.4 mg/dL in women (p = 0.015), as compared to coffee consumption of 0 mL/day. No significant association of the FPG level was observed with any of the other types/amounts of beverages consumed. On the other hand, significant associations were found between the HbA1c levels and consumption of several types of beverages.

Conclusions:
High coffee consumption was associated with lower FPG levels in this Japanese population. Some unexpected associations of the HbA1c levels with the consumption of some types of beverages were observed, which need to be further investigated.

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