By clicking “Accept”, you agree to the storing of cookies on your device to enhance site navigation, analyse site usage, and assist in our marketing efforts. View our Privacy Policy for more information.
Coffee & Health
Other coffee & health research

L Tang et al, 2022. Sex-specific association between coffee consumption and incident chronic kidney disease: a population-based analysis of 359,906 participants from the UK Biobank, Chinese Medical Journal.

. Sex-specific association between coffee consumption and incident chronic kidney disease: a population-based analysis of 359,906 participants from the UK Biobank

L Tang et al
Chinese Medical Journal
August 9, 2022

ABSTRACT

Background:
The risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) is influenced by genetic predisposition, sex, and lifestyle. Previous research indicates that coffee is a potentially protective factor in CKD. The current study aims to investigate whether sex disparity exists in the coffee-CKD association, and whether genetic risk of CKD or genetic polymorphisms of caffeine metabolism affect this association.

Methods:
A total of 359,906 participants from the UK Biobank who were enrolled between 2006 and 2010 were included in this prospective cohort study, which aimed to estimate the hazard ratios for coffee intake and incident CKD using a Cox proportional hazard model. Allele scores of CKD and caffeine metabolism were additionally adjusted for in a subsample with qualified genetic data (n = 255,343). Analyses stratified by genetic predisposition, comorbidities, and sex hormones were performed. Tests based on Bayesian model averaging were conducted to ascertain the robustness of the results.

Results:
Coffee was inversely associated with CKD in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of coffee did not differ across different strata of genetic risk for CKD, but were more evident among slower genetically predicted caffeine metabolizers. Significant sex disparity was observed (P value for interaction = 0.013), in that coffee drinking was only associated with the risk reduction of CKD in females. Subgroup analysis revealed that testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), but not estradiol, modified the coffee-CKD association.

Conclusions:
In addition to the overall inverse coffee-CKD association that was observed in the general population, we could also establish that a sex disparity existed, in that females were more likely to experience the benefit of the association. Testosterone and SHBG may partly account for the sex disparity.

More research

All research