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Coffee & Health
Bone health

Overview

The role of coffee and caffeine in bone health is yet to be established and further research is required, however no association has been found on the reduction of bone density or risk of fractures

Part of
Bone health
More information
Affects of coffee consumption

3-5 cups

of coffee per day is considered safe for most adults

400mg

of caffeine per day is considered safe for most adults

75mg

of caffeine can be found in the average cup of coffee

A series of meta-analyses have not suggested any significant association between caffeine intake and bone mineral density, although there is some variability in the results of studies1-5. For instance, potentially negative effects on bone mineral density were recorded in populations with insufficient calcium intake. Some research has also suggested that there may be an association between coffee consumption and the risk of hip fracture, particularly in older women1,2,4,5.

One study has considered whether caffeine might affect bone mineral density and suggested that it might hinder the absorption of nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D, which are essential for bone health. Nevertheless, the same study concluded that whilst caffeine consumption was associated with a small reduction in bone density, this did not translate into increased risk of fractures8. Clearly, there is a need for more research to draw further conclusions.

The European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) review of caffeine safety concluded that an intake of up to 400mg caffeine per day from all sources is safe for most adults, except pregnant women for whom a limit of 200mg per day is advised. A cup of coffee contains approximately 75mg caffeine.

The content in this overview was last edited in May 2018. Papers in the latest research section and further resources are added regularly.

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