Nystad T. et al. The effect of coffee consumption on serum total cholesterol in the Sami & Norwegian populations. Public Health Nutrition, doi: 10.1017/S1368980010000376.

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Public Health Nutrition, doi: 10.1017/S1368980010000376.

The effect of coffee consumption on serum total cholesterol in the Sami & Norwegian populations.

Nystad T. et al.

Objective: To assess coffee consumption in the Sami and Norwegian populations and to investigate the impact of unfiltered boiled coffee consumption on serum cholesterol concentrations.
Design: A cross-sectional study. Information was collected by self-administrated questionnaires and total serum cholesterol was analysed. Participants were divided into three ethnic groups: Sami I (Sami used as home language in the last three generations), Sami II (at least one Sami identity marker) and Norwegian.
Setting: In an area with Sami, Kven/Finnish and Norwegian populations, the SAMINOR study, 2003-2004.
Subjects: A total of 5647 men and 6347 women aged 36-79 years.
Results: More than 90 % of the study populations were coffee drinkers. Only 22 % were unfiltered coffee consumers. Sami I had the highest proportion of participants who consumed nine or more cups of unfiltered coffee per day, although the number of participants was limited. Total coffee consumption was associated with increased total cholesterol for men (P < 0•01) and women (P < 0•0001). For those who drank only unfiltered coffee, a significant association was found only in Norwegian men, adjusted for physical activity in leisure time, BMI and smoking habits (P < 0•001). From the lowest (less than five cups) to the highest (nine or more cups) unfiltered coffee consumption category, the mean total cholesterol levels increased by 0•29 mmol/l in Norwegian men. Conclusions: Unfiltered coffee consumption was lower in the present study compared to previous reports. In general, total coffee consumption was positively associated with total cholesterol levels. However, for unfiltered coffee consumption, an association was found only in Norwegian men.

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