Kempf K et al. Effects of coffee consumption on subclinical inflammation and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a clinical trial. Am J Clin Nutr 2010 ; 91 : 950-7.

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Am J Clin Nutr 2010 ; 91 : 950-7.

Effects of coffee consumption on subclinical inflammation and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a clinical trial.

Kempf K et al.

Background: Coffee consumption is associated with a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. Suggested mechanisms underlying the association have included attenuation of subclinical inflammation and a reduction in oxidative stress.
Objective: The aim was to investigate the effects of daily coffee consumption on biomarkers of coffee intake, subclinical inflammation, oxidative stress, glucose, and lipid metabolism.
Design: Habitual coffee drinkers (n = 47) refrained for 1 mo from coffee drinking; in the second month they consumed 4 cups of filtered coffee/d and in the third month 8 cups of filtered coffee/d (150 mL/cup). Blood samples were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, bead-based multiplex technology, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or immunonephelometry.
Results: Coffee consumption led to an increase in coffee-derived compounds, mainly serum caffeine, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid metabolites. Significant changes were also observed for serum concentrations of interleukin-18, 8-isoprostane, and adiponectin (medians: –8%, −16%, and 6%, respectively; consumption of 8 compared with 0 cups coffee/d). Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A-I increased significantly by 12%, 7%, and 4%, respectively, whereas the ratios of LDL to HDL cholesterol and of apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A-I decreased significantly by 8% and 9%, respectively (8 compared with 0 cups coffee/d). No changes were seen for markers of glucose metabolism in an oral-glucose-tolerance test.
Conclusions: Coffee consumption appears to have beneficial effects on subclinical inflammation and HDL cholesterol, whereas no changes in glucose metabolism were found in our study. Furthermore, many coffee-derived methylxanthines and caffeic acid metabolites appear to be useful as biomarkers of coffee intake.

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