E Nakano et al, 2020. Relationship between intraocular pressure and coffee consumption in a Japanese population without glaucoma: The Nagahama study, Ophthalmology Glaucoma, published online.

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ABSTRACT

Purpose:
To evaluate the association between daily coffee consumption and intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy subjects without glaucoma and the association between daily coffee consumption and history of glaucoma.

Design:
Cross-sectional study.

Participants:
A total of 9,850 individuals participated in the first follow-up of the Nagahama Prospective Cohort for Comprehensive Human Bioscience (the Nagahama study) conducted between 2013 to 2016.

Methods:
All subjects underwent a standardized ophthalmic examination. Self-reporting questionnaires were completed by all participants. Firstly, the association between habitual coffee consumption and intraocular pressure (IOP) among non-glaucoma individuals was evaluated by a multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusting for possible confounders. Secondly, the association between habitual coffee consumption and history of glaucoma was also evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression analysis.

Main Outcome Measures:
The association between habitual coffee consumption and intraocular pressure (IOP) among non-glaucoma individuals.

Results:
Of 9,850 participants, 9,418 subjects did not have history of glaucoma. Among these subjects, the average IOP of both eyes was 14.7 ± 2.9 mmHg (mean ± standard deviation). The multivariable regression analysis revealed that habitual coffee consumption was significantly associated with IOP (p < 0.001): the higher the consumption of coffee, the lower the IOP of an individual. The IOP of the group that consumed coffee most frequently (more than or equal to three times a day) was 0.4 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 0.2 to 0.5mmHg) lower than that of the group that consumed coffee least frequently (less than once a day). On the other hand, the logistic regression analysis showed that habitual coffee consumption was not significantly associated with history of glaucoma (P=0.53).

Conclusions:
Frequent coffee consumption was associated with a slightly lower IOP in people without glaucoma, but was not associated with a decreased risk of developing glaucoma. Additional experimental studies are needed to examine the effects of coffee on IOP and glaucoma risk.

 

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