A Kuang et al, 2018. Lipidomic response to coffee consumption, Nutrients, Volume 10 (12).

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ABSTRACT

Coffee is widely consumed and contains many bioactive compounds, any of which may impact pathways related to disease development. Our objective was to identify individual lipid changes in response to coffee drinking. We profiled the lipidome of fasting serum samples collected from a previously reported single blinded, three-stage clinical trial. Forty-seven habitual coffee consumers refrained from drinking coffee for 1 month, consumed 4 cups of coffee/day in the second month and 8 cups/day in the third month. Samples collected after each coffee stage were subject to quantitative lipidomic profiling using ion-mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry. A total of 853 lipid species mapping to 14 lipid classes were included for univariate analysis. Three lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species including LPC (20:4), LPC (22:1) and LPC (22:2), significantly decreased after coffee intake (p < 0.05 and q < 0.05). An additional 72 species mapping to the LPC, free fatty acid, phosphatidylcholine, cholesteryl ester and triacylglycerol classes of lipids were nominally associated with coffee intake (p < 0.05 and q > 0.05); 58 of these decreased after coffee intake. In conclusion, coffee intake leads to lower levels of specific LPC species with potential impacts on glycerophospholipid metabolism more generally.

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