H Uemura et al, 2013, Consumption of coffee, not green tea, is inversely associated with arterial stiffness in Japanese men. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, published online ahead of print.

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BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Studies on the associations between coffee and green tea consumption and arterial stiffness are rare. This study evaluated the possible relationships between coffee and green tea consumption and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) values in Japanese men.
SUBJECTS/METHODS: In total, 540 eligible men who enrolled in the baseline survey of a cohort study in Tokushima Prefecture, Japan, and who underwent ba-PWV measurement were analyzed. Information about lifestyle characteristics including coffee and green tea intake were obtained from a structural self-administered questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between coffee and green tea consumption and ba-PWV.
RESULTS: Subjects with greater coffee consumption were younger and showed higher proportions of current smoking and alcohol consumption. Subjects with greater green tea consumption were older and showed lower proportions of current smoking and alcohol consumption. Greater coffee consumption was significantly inversely associated with ba-PWV after the adjustment for probable covariates, including serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P for trend =0.031). After additional adjustment for serum triglycerides, this inverse association persisted, but was somewhat attenuated (P for trend =0.050). In contrast, green tea consumption was not associated with ba PWV.
CONCLUSIONS: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with arterial stiffness independent of known atherosclerotic risk factors, and this association was partly mediated by reduced circulating triglycerides. Further prospective or interventional studies are needed to confirm the causal association.

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