Coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes – Part 2

Print this page

This is the second of three blog posts on the topic of coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes, concentrating on the impact coffee consumption has on type 2 diabetes. Coffee and Health also houses current scientific information on a wide range of other coffee-related topics.

Regular coffee consumption linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes

Studies have found a statistically significant negative association for coffee and type 2 diabetes in different populations. In addition, a higher level of coffee consumption has been linked to a low incidence of diabetes. Taken together, these are strong indicators of a true association between the consumption of coffee and a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes.

A 2002 Dutch cohort study of 17,111 adults and 306 new cases of type 2 diabetes, showed a statistically significant negative association between coffee consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This finding was also seen in a 2009 review covering 457,922 individuals and 21,897 newly diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes from eight different countries.

More recently, eight more epidemiological studies have been published. All eight have confirmed the inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Two further review papers, both published in 2012, add to the existing body of evidence suggesting that habitual coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

The findings therefore show that:

  • Every additional cup of coffee per day is associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes
  • Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day

Decaffeinated coffee and tea also linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes

As with caffeinated coffee, the majority of published studies which have evaluated the relationship between decaffeinated coffee or tea drinking and risk of type 2 diabetes have reported similar negative associations.

For more information on coffee and type 2 diabetes, and to view reference material, click here.

Presentations from experts present at the World Congress on Prevention of Diabetes and Its Complications (WCPD) can also be viewed here.

 

This information is intended for Healthcare professional audiences.
Please consider the environment before printing.