Coffee & Health unveils its latest topic: Neurodegenerative Disorders

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The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) has extended the scientific information available on its Coffee & Health website, with Neurodegenerative Disorders the latest topic to be introduced. Based on the latest research, the new information provides a review of the scientific evidence on the relationship between coffee drinking and neurodegenerative disorders – cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and stroke.

Moderate, lifelong consumption of coffee appears to have a beneficial effect on our cognitive abilities as we age.

In particular, key highlights include:

  • Studies suggest that regular, lifelong, moderate consumption of coffee/caffeine slows down physiological, age-related cognitive decline, especially in women and those over 80 years old in particular
  • Although epidemiological research suggests that lifelong, moderate coffee consumption is linked to a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, further studies are warranted before any firm conclusions can be drawn
  • There is a substantial amount of epidemiological research showing that as coffee consumption rises, the risk of Parkinson’s disease falls, which suggests a potential beneficial effect of coffee
  • Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may also reduce the risk of stroke

Neurodegenerative Disorders, the latest scientific topic to be added to Coffee & Health, sits alongside cardiovascular health, fluid balance, gallstones, liver function, pregnancy, sports performance, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

Coming soon to Coffee & Health is a vodcast in which Dr Astrid Nehlig, from the French National Medical Research Institute (INSERM), discusses the latest scientific research highlighted in this new topic.

For more information on the relationship between coffee drinking and neurodegenerative disorders, click here.

 

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