A Gavrieli et al, 2013. Effect of Different Amounts of Coffee on Dietary Intake and Appetite of Normal-Weight and Overweight/Obese Individuals, Obesity, published online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT
Objective: To investigate the effects of different coffee amounts on dietary intake and appetite feelings in normal-weight and overweight/obese individuals.
Design and Methods: Thirty-three volunteers (16 normal-weight, 17 overweight/obese) participated in three trials: they consumed a standard breakfast along with 200 ml of either coffee with 3 or 6 mg caffeine/kg body weight (Coffee 3 and Coffee 6, respectively), or water. At fasting and at standard time points for the 3 h following breakfast/drink consumption participants recorded their appetite feelings on visual analogue scales. At 180 min, participants consumed an ad libitum meal and the next day they recalled their food intake during the experimental day.
Results: A significant intervention effect was found for the energy intake of the ad libitum meal (P = 0.05) and of the whole day (P = 0.02) only in overweight/obese individuals. Specifically, Coffee 6 resulted in a reduced energy intake during the ad libitum meal compared to Coffee 3 (P = 0.03) and in the total day compared to both water (P = 0.04) and Coffee 3 (P = 0.008). No effect was observed for the appetite feelings.
Conclusions: A moderate coffee amount can effectively reduce energy intake in the following meal and in the total day compared to lower or no coffee intake in overweight/obese participants.

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